Five UK cities gain Tree Cities of the World status

In a world first, five UK councils have been awarded ‘Tree Cities of the World’ status for their commitment to urban forestry management.

Birmingham City Council, Bradford City Council, and the London Boroughs of Barking & Dagenham, Camden, and Ealing have all been honoured with Tree Cities of the World recognition through a global programme that will connect cities around the world. The authorities join a new global network of cities spanning 17 countries across Europe, the Americas, Australia and New Zealand, dedicated to adopting the most successful approaches to managing urban trees and forests.

The Tree Cities of the World programme connects cities around the world so they can share approaches to managing urban trees and forests – all to make our cities greener and more robust.

To earn this recognition, each council met five core standards for urban forest management and are among the first around the world to be celebrated for excellence in city forestry and commitment to urban forestry management.

Trees provide multiple benefits to a community when properly planted, established and maintained. They help to improve visual appeal, offer shade, remove air pollutants and provide wildlife habitat, among many other benefits.

David Elliott, chief executive at Trees for Cities, the charity leading the initiative in the UK, said: “We believe that the Tree Cities of the World initiative will provide a robust platform through which we can better plant, protect and celebrate our urban tree heritage. Trees for Cities is delighted to congratulate the first cohort of Councils in the UK who have been rewarded for the high standards of urban forestry that they demonstrate.”