Nottingham scheme to reduce the energy demand in buildings

Nottingham City Council is taking part in a new project looking at how people and technology can work better together to reduce the energy demand within its buildings.

Having invested £400,000 in over thirty energy saving projects last yer, the move is part of the council’s ongoing push to reduce running costs and minimise its carbon footprint. Last year, the projects contributed to annual savings of £100,000 with an average project payback of less than four years.

Joining the eTEACHER Project, Nottingham City Council will analyse how people and technology can work better together to reduce the energy demand within their buildings. The overall goal of the project is to encourage a behavioural change in energy end-users to achieve energy bill savings and improve wider health and well-being. In total, 12 pilot buildings across Europe will receive new technologies and training for the people who use them.

Buildings in Nottingham that will be included in the trial are The Council House and Djanogly City Academy, and, if the pilots are successful, the technologies will be rolled out across other heritage buildings and schools in Nottingham.

David Liversidge, said: “This project is a great opportunity for us to learn more about how we use our buildings and how our behaviour can positively impact energy bills and the environment. It supports our ambitions to reduce carbon emissions that arise from our operations, reduce our operating costs and to help improve air quality for the city.”